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Minimize Airborne Illnesses in Your Home

04 Dec 18 |No Comments
Minimize Airborne Illnesses in Your Home

The quality of air inside residential homes might surprise you. While they might feel and appear to be clean and cozy, houses can actually be filled with microscopic pollutants that cause respiratory issues and even allergies. In homes that are newer, they are often sealed better and have improved insulation. These homes do keep the cold chills out, but at the same time, they are sealing the impurities that are in the air inside.   Health Concerns Caused by Airborne Illnesses The Environmental Protection Agency has found that inside air that we breathe up to 90% of the time can be 2-5 times more diseased than average outdoor weather. Unfortunately, the visible dirt in residential homes is just the tip of the iceberg. The dust that accumulates on bookcases and end tables is just a glimpse of what is actually hiding in the air: an undetectable blend of pollen, mold, dust mites, smoke, dander, and pollutants can all dangerously impact your health.   What Is an Airborne Illness? Airborne sickness (also known as airborne disease or airborne illness) occurs when a person comes in contact with infected tiny pathogenic microbes through coughing, sneezing, laughing, or from personal contact. When the microbes are discharged, they are present in water, air, and even on small dust atoms. An individual could contract airborne illness if he or she inhales infected microbes, physically touches remainders of the microbes that could be present on surfaces within the home or on pets.   Air currents can spread airborne illness from one room to another, which can cause the infected microbes to be inhaled in the same area as the infected person or the invisible microbes can be spread further, depending on ventilation, environment, and the temperature. Respiratory protection, ventilation, and careful air handling will be required to stop an airborne disease from spreading. HVAC filters like HEPA are very expensive and only work when the HVAC is running, and they do not cool the home, they simply purify the air while Whole House Fans do both.   How a Whole House Fan Can Reduce Airborne Illnesses Though it may not be possible to achieve complete air purity, whole house fans can help substantially in decreasing the number of pollutants in the average residential home. It’s possible to have purer air with a whole house fan, and the installation process is not as complicated as it might sound. Installation for a whole house fan can be affordable and fast.   Studies have documented a statistically central correlation between increased health and more ventilation. Since whole house fans are mounted to the ceiling of a house’s top level, they are effective in helping push stale air out. The fan is located between the attic and the highest floor and forces air out of the living areas of the house, blows it through the attic, and finally releases the air outside through the attic vents. Based on the research, health risks can occur when homes have a rate of ventilation that is less than 0.4 air changes per hour (the amount of air added to or taken from a home divided by the total size of the home).   Potential Impacts on Health Benefits There are a few aspects that can affect how well the air within a home can actually be ventilated with this equipment. First, whole house fans that have been recently installed are the most effective in making a positive difference in health conditions. Positive health impacts have been seen when the fan is built into the home or building and also when the equipment is installed after construction.   Finally, keep in mind that since the equipment is often used heavily, it’s important to keep a whole house fan in top condition. Improper maintenance or outdated equipment might make a negative difference in the health benefits, which is why it’s important to stay current with the manufacturer’s recommended maintenance schedule.